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Everything You Need to Know About Managing AI in Your Workplace

Everything-You-Need-to-Know-About-Managing-AI-in-Your-Workplace

Everything You Need to Know About Managing AI in Your Workplace

Artificial intelligence (AI) has entered the workplace. It’s weaved its way into many of the day-to-day business functions we no longer have to worry about. There is a lot of chatter about ‘what’ jobs will be replaced by AI, but for right now, it’s not about job replacement – it’s about task reassignment.

New AI technologies that have emerged in the workplace are discussed below, as well as the intent of AI and red flags to look out for on ethical issues.

Chatbots Taking Help Desk Calls

Chatbots are commonplace and part of the features of many websites and customer service platforms. Customer-facing marketing automation software like HubSpot added this feature three years ago when they saw the competitive landscape of Liveperson, LiveChat IBM Watson and Amazon Lex.

Chatbots are great for first-tier customer communication and help. However, it should be clear to users they are talking to a chatbot and not another human. Chatbots should be programmed to escalate conversations to humans that are not being resolved in a quick timeframe or are not going well. Chatbots should also have limitations, such as customer service outside of 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET, inquiries from users that may need foreign language translation, or simplified transactions.

Management of Access and Movements

Managing employee or user access for physical environments is becoming widespread in both businesses and on college campuses. By providing employees or users a unique identifier card, bracelet or code – organizations can now track individual usage and movements. How this works in the workforce is similar to how it’s currently being rolled out at college campuses and other large-scale physical facilities.

Your ‘swipe’ card provides you access to the buildings you are permitted to enter. It also gives you access to the technology and machines you have ‘permissions’ to use. This can be from entry to storage rooms, cafeterias, private offices, departmental offices, gyms, labs and supply rooms.

The documentation of your movements coupled with video cameras with image recognition technology can track a person’s movements and whereabouts down to the second.

The benefits of MAM are facility departments and other stakeholders can understand the usage of the entire physical facility. How many employees use the gym each day? What are the busiest hours? They can also send notifications if capacity limits are close. Security becomes more streamlined when you know who is where and at what time.

Where these systems get murky is when users don’t know their movements are being tracked and monitored. Amazon got a lot of heat recently when they were publicly accused of patenting a device to trackevery movement of their employees. This became such a public outcry, there was a recent Dr. Who episode named Kerblamthat mimicked this corporate scenario.

Using MAM systems in organizations like college campuses opens up all kinds of questions on privacy and ethics.

Job Applicant Screening and Tracking Systems

In the recruiting industry, AI has been used for a while. Reviewing resumes is time-consuming, so having AI screen resumes, perform social verification of job history and experience and handle the communication process is a real time-saver. This is such a dominant topic in the recruiting industry that we wrote about it in November 2018, in the article Is AI Influencing Your Hiring Process?

The benefits of using AI in the hiring process are smarter and faster candidate screening, removal of human biases, creating a positive and proactive candidate experience, access to real-time recruiting metrics, and creating better job descriptions.

The downside is biases can be built into the system if you don’t have oversight on the developers that are programming the AI. Amazon had this problem and discovered the AI program was biased against women because the AI programmers were mostly men.

As recruitment specialists, the Jarvi Group is committed to a combined approach of technical, AI-based recruitment to ensure your final candidates have both the soft skills needed to succeed in your company, and the technical skills to accomplish their role.

Reach out to the Jarvi Group today!